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Utah State Fair Broadcast Campaign Right On Target

mediaRif is the agency of record for the Utah State Fair. As such, we are tasked with bringing new life to the fair through concise, compelling, and engaging communication with the public. In 2018, we decided that a 1980’s retro theme would be a perfect fit. This is due to the resurgence of 80’s pop culture that has come into vogue. Much of this is the result of the age of those who grew up in the 80s. 80’s teenagers are now in their 40’s. Their kids are at impressionable ages and parents like to share their youthful experiences with the younger generation. This puts teens of the 80’s right in the pocket when it comes to expendable income. Hence, we targeted them by putting an 80’s spin on the Utah State Fair’s campaign.

As an agency, we strive to get right down to what compels people to visit the fair. The formula to us is simple; people come for rides, food, and to see animals. These three draws have come to be known as the three pillars of our Stat Fair ad strategy.

To broaden the campaign, we assigned each pillar a slice of the 80’s. In our broadcast campaign, we composed 3 sound-a-like jingles, based on Michael Jackson’s Thriller, Working 9 to 5, and Def Leppard’s Pour Some Sugar On Me. By diversifying the song genres, we were able to appeal to multiple sectors of 80’s pop culture fans, ie. country, hard rock, and hip hop (all 80’s style).

The original jingles we composed also acted as :30 radio spots and locked the entire campaign together.

Since our goal was to draw families to the fair, we used kids in the spots, lots of kids. We made them cute. We showcased their talent. Most of all, we made the spots aspirational. Kids on the farm. Kids at carnival ride central. Kids at a rock concert.

The end result of our campaign, a record-breaking year for attendance, food sales, and ride receipts at the Utah State Fair.

Sometimes as advertisers, we get caught up in going after awards and showcasing so-called art. It comes down to this: our clients want to sell tickets, products, and services. If advertising doesn’t do that, it doesn’t matter how artistic it is.

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